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Table 3 Criteria for a clinical relapse and application of MRI for judgement for a relapse

From: Insights on diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making patterns for multiple sclerosis treatment: cross-sectional opinion survey results from Japanese neurologists

Questions and answers Overall
(n = 205)
Sub-group by the number of MS patients under care P value
Group 1:
1–3 patients (n = 69)
Group 2:
4–9 patients (n = 58)
Group 3:
≥10 patients (n = 78)
Group comparison* Trend test
Question 1: Do any of the following constitute a clinical relapse in your practice (in the absence of comorbidities, such as acute infection)?
a. New/worsening symptoms lasting > 24 h, no neurological exam performed, n (%) 98 (47.8) 29 (42.0) 31 (53.4) 38 (48.7) 0.199a
0.416b
0.585c
0.437
b. New/worsening symptoms lasting > 24 h, no change in neurological exam, n (%) 106 (51.7) 29 (42.0) 34 (58.6) 43 (55.1) 0.063a
0.113b
0.684c
0.122
c. New/worsening symptoms lasting > 24 h and worsening neurological exam, n (%) 201 (98.0) 67 (97.1) 57 (98.3) 77 (98.7) 0.664a
0.489b
0.832c
0.483
Question 2: In a patient presenting with a clinical relapse based on your definition of a relapse, do you usually order an MRI scan?
Yes, n (%) 205 (100.0) 69 (100.0) 58 (100.0) 78 (100.0)
Question 3: Does the appearance of new asymptomatic MRI activity constitute the equivalent of a clinical relapse?
Yes, n (%) 130 (63.4) 43 (62.3) 38 (65.5) 49 (62.8) 0.709a
0.950b
0.746c
0.960
  1. MRI magnetic resonance imaging, MS multiple sclerosis
  2. *Percentages were compared between two groups using the chi-square test, and the corresponding P values are indicated for the following comparisons: a: Group 1 vs. Group 2, b: Group 1 vs. Group 3, c: Group 2 vs. Group 3
  3. The trend across the three groups was tested using the Cochran-Armitage test